What`s New in Breast Cancer Research?

Research into the causes, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer is being done in many medical centers throughout the world.

NASA software used to enhance Earth Science Imagery could one day aid in the interpretation of mammogram’s, ultrasounds and other medical imagery. The left image shows an original mammogram before MED-SEG processing. The image on the right, with region of interest (white) labeled, shows a mammogram after MED-SEG processing. The new MED-SEG system, developed by Bartron Medical Imaging, Inc., relies on software developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center to help doctors analyze mammogram’s, ultrasounds, digital X-rays, and other medical imaging tests. Bartron MED-SEGTM system now has FDA clearance, received their CE Mark and is also ISO 13485 & 9001 certified. (NASA/Bartron Medical Imaging)

3D Printing points way to smarter cancer treatment

cells_3d_printing_reuters
British scientists have developed a new use for 3D printing, putting it to work to create personalized replica models of cancerous parts of the body to allow doctors to target tumors more precisely. The initiative is the latest example of medicine harnessing the rapidly emerging technology, which has already been used to manufacture some medical implants.

3D printing makes products by layering material until a three-dimensional object is created. Automotive and aerospace companies use it for producing prototypes as well as creating specialized tools, moldings and some end-use parts. In healthcare, 3D printers are used by dentists to create replicas of jaws and teeth, as well as some finished dental implants, while orthopedic surgeons have tested them to make customized hip replacements. And last year U.S. scientists grew human ears from cow cells with the help of a 3D printer.

The new cancer work involves printing 3D “phantoms” of tumors and organs based on CT scans taken of patients during treatment. These plastic moulds can be filled with liquid, allowing experts see in detail the flow of so-called radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioactive material that may be injected into a vein, taken by mouth or placed in a body cavity. The challenge is to give a dose that is high enough to kill cancer cells, without causing excessive collateral damage to healthy tissue

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